SPIRITED THINKING SINCE 1888
Life & Soul
October 16, 2020
Thomas Storck
John XXIII. The very name is apt to elicit strong reactions from many Catholics. He was either the pope who finally began to free the Church from her medieval accretions and rigidities or, on the other hand, the pope who initiated the fatal comprom­ise with the world which has proven to be such a disaster.
October 16, 2020
Rob Flello
“I had, for all my adult life, been an atheist. Although as a baby I was baptised into the Church of England, I had rejected all things religious. I was critical of anybody’s faith and had very secular views on matters of conscience, for example. “Around 2007 I was going through some difficult times in
October 16, 2020
Alan Fimister
For the last century and a half the Church has been dominated by the papacy. The papacy has always been there, instituted by Our Lord Himself, like the sun in the heavens, but for the last 150 years we have been living in a heatwave. To start with there were a lot of fun times
October 16, 2020
Sr Carino Hodder
Of all the personal discoveries which Catholics have made over the course of the lockdown – a taste for gardening; a skill for music; everything we’d hitherto never had time to watch on Netflix – perhaps one of the most significant, and yet most overlooked, is the reclaiming of an essential aspect of our baptismal
October 16, 2020
Matthew Schmitz
Countless institutions have been strained in 2020. Coronavirus has shuttered business and shattered marriages. Following the death of George Floyd, denunciations, resignations, and firings spread across newspapers, corporations, and universities. These intertwining crises pose a special threat to one of America’s most popular sports: football. Football’s glory is based on risk. Its fans thrill to
October 16, 2020
Bishop David McGough
Twenty-ninth Sunday of the Year Isaiah 45: 1 & 4-6; 1 Thessalonians 1: 1-5; Matthew 22: 15-21 “Thus says the Lord to his anointed, to Cyrus, whom he has taken by his right hand to subdue nations before him. It is for the sake of my servant Jacob, of Israel my chosen one, that I
October 09, 2020
Bishop David McGough
Twenty-eighth Sunday of the Year Isaiah 25: 6-10; Philippians 4: 12-14 &19-20; Matthew 22: 1-14 “On this mountain, the Lord of hosts will prepare for all peoples a banquet of rich food, a banquet of fine wines, of food rich and juicy, of fine strained wines.” The prophet Isaiah’s description of salvation as a lavish banquet spoke
October 02, 2020
Bishop David McGough
Twenty-seventh Sunday of the Year Isaiah 5: 1-7; Philippians 3: 6-9; Matthew 21: 33-43 “Let me sing to my friend the song of his love for his vineyard. My friend had a vineyard on a fertile hillside. He dug the soil, cleared it of stones, and planted choice vines in it. He expected it to yield grapes,
September 29, 2020
Fr Lawrence Lew, OP
The Dominican pope Saint Pius V had a room in Santa Sabina, the Dominican headquarters in Rome, and that room is now maintained as a small chapel, adjacent to the wing known as the Master’s Corridor. One of the frescoes in this chapel depicts the sainted pontiff kneeling with the Rosary in his hand as
September 29, 2020
Eleanor Parker
October falls between two high points of the festival year: the great feast of Michaelmas at the end of September and the solemn season of Hallowtide, which begins on October’s last night. Many of the customs associated with Michaelmas, such as fairs and eating goose, once lasted well into October, and after the calendar change
September 29, 2020
Fr John Zuhlsdorf
On October 7 1571 a Christian navy routed the seemingly unstoppable forces of Islam in a massive battle in the Ionian Sea’s Bay of Patras, near Lepanto. The commander of the Catholic fleet, Juan of Austria, had a statue of Our Lady on the quarterdeck of his flagship and the sailors prayed the Most Holy
September 29, 2020
Fr Andrew Pinsent
“Providence” is from a word that means “to foresee,” conveying the notion that God directs the cosmos and human affairs with wise benevolence. In a providential cosmos or life, time is not simply a succession of moments, like the ticking of a clock, but takes on an organic direction, as if marking progress or growth